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More Tips On Protecting Your Virtual Meetings to Avoid A Cybersecurity Breach: An Update

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April 17, 2020 | FG Law Blog
Donna Urban, Krishna Jani

To view the post on the FG Law Blog, click here.

At this point, many of us are well into our fourth or fifth week of quarantine due to the outbreak of COVID-19. Even for those of us who are fortunate enough to be able to work remotely from our homes, this comes with certain challenges, including potential security issues with virtual conferencing. In our first installment about virtual meetings, and their unintended vulnerabilities, we provided some guidance on how you and your staff might implement certain strategies to keep your virtual conferences as safe as possible from hackers and trolls. In this new installment, we will provide further guidance on staying safe amidst emerging privacy and security concerns associated with virtual meeting platforms.

Zoom Announces Updates to its Data Privacy and Security Measures

On April 1, 2020, the Chief Operating Officer of Zoom, Eric Yuan, announced certain changes that Zoom is making to enhance its virtual meeting spaces. On April 14th, the Chief Product Officer of Zoom, Oded Gal, provided clarification on those enhancements to those of us who are using Zoom during quarantine.

For example, right now Zoom recommends recording your meetings whenever practicable to ensure a forensic trail is created, as stated above. In addition, Zoom recommends taking a screenshot whenever a bad actor enters your virtual meeting. Then, you can report this intruder on Zoom’s website. And starting this coming weekend, Zoom will be releasing a new security feature built into the app, which will allow users to send a report to Zoom right from the security button should any unwanted interference arise.

Other Noteworthy Developments

Zoom announced that as of April 1, 2020, it would freeze all future product development except for data privacy and security updates for the following 90 days. Moreover, beginning April 18, 2020, every paid Zoom customer will be able to customize which data center regions their account can use for its real-time meeting traffic. By default, however, there will be no connection to any data centers in China beginning April 18, 2020 for all users. Additionally, users with an “.edu” registered email address are automatically given the highest level of security in their meetings, and this will continue. Zoom has begun to address user demands for a “kid-friendly” interface, but it has not yet launched any such interface.

Other virtual meeting platforms, such as GoToMeeting, have also enacted enhanced security protections in their respective applications. For example, GoToMeeting gathers cyber threat intel through partnerships including external intelligence communities, personal and professional sharing groups, and its own internal research to collect Indicators of Compromise or IoC data. IoC can include forensic data such as IP addresses, domains, hashes, and pulls them into its threat intelligence platform to reduce the risk of cyber threats.

Still though, platforms like Zoom and GoToMeeting urge users to utilize additional security measures as outlined in our previous blog post, and above, to provide the greatest level of privacy and data security for your virtual meetings.

Updates on Regulatory Guidance

On April 8th, Senator Edward Markey, whose priorities include telecommunications, technology, and privacy policy, urged the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to publish industry cybersecurity guidelines “for companies that provide online conferencing services, as well as best practices for users that will help protect online safety and privacy during this pandemic and beyond.”

In Senator Markey’s letter, he urges that the guidance cover, at a minimum, the following topics:

Senator Markey also requests that the FTC develop best practices for online conferencing users, so that they can make informed, safe decisions when choosing and using these platforms. He requests that these best practices cover at least the following topics:

To date, the FTC has not published new guidelines.

Remember to have a plan and be prepared. Stay safe, everyone!

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to Donna UrbanKrishna Jani, or any member of Flaster Greenberg’s Telecommunications or Privacy & Data Security Groups.  

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